Application Articles

15 articles found.

  1. Energy Recovery Applications: Optimizing Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems (ERA/114-07)

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    Optimizing Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems Bringing outdoor air into a building is vital for maintaining good indoor air quality. However, outdoor air can be very expensive to temper and, if not properly conditioned, can cause humidity problems for the building....
    July 1st, 2007

  2. Energy Recovery Applications: Fire Safety Standards and Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERA/112-05)

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    Greenhecks Commercial Energy Recovery Unit The subject of fire safety is an important issue for customers and the engineering community. The following will serve as a guide to the fire safety issue including factual information about the codes and standards...
    July 25th, 2005

  3. Energy Recovery Applications: Frost Control for Energy Recovery Wheels (ERA/113-05)

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    Frost control for energy recovery devices comes in various strategies  all of which are designed to do what the name suggests  control frost. This article will discuss frost control strategies as they apply to a passive, air-to-air energy recovery wheel process...
    July 25th, 2005

  4. Energy Recovery Applications: ASHRAE Standard 62 Addendum y - Acceptable Cross Leakage for Energy Recovery Applications

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    With addendum y of ASHRAE Standard 62-2001 (Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality), HVAC system designers now have clear-cut parameters for allowable ERV cross leakage/cross contamination. This article communicates some of the key elements of this addendum....
    October 21st, 2004

  5. Energy Recovery Applications: ARI Certified vs. Non-Certified Performance Ratings of Energy Recovery Wheels (ERA/110-03)

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    Engineers rely heavily on manufacturers' performance data for product selection. The quality of the data needs to be ensured so engineers can meet their design intentions and can accurately compare products from different manufacturers. For these reasons, our...
    October 1st, 2003

  6. Energy Recovery Applications: Cross Leakage - Application and Purge Considerations (ERA/108-02)

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    There appears to be some misconceptions surrounding energy recovery wheels and the need to minimize airstream cross leakage. One area of confusion relates to acceptable cross leakage rates to differing applications. Another area of misunderstanding pertains...
    November 7th, 2002

  7. Energy Recovery Applications: Sizing Air Conditioning Equipment to Maximize Energy Recovery Benefits(ERA/107-02)

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    Many designers have realized the benefits of energy recovery. In addition to complying with ASHRAE 62-1999 while controlling operating expenses, a properly designed ventilation system that incorporates total enthalpy recovery will realize the following benefits....
    November 7th, 2002

  8. Energy Recovery Applications: Energy Recovery Wheel Maintenance (ERA/106-02)

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    The routine maintenance requirements of all equipment needs to be considered in the initial system design. If equipment is difficult to maintain, chances are it will be ignored, reducing the effectiveness and life expectancy of the equipment. The maintenance...
    November 1st, 2002

  9. Energy Recovery Applications: The Importance of ARIPerformance Certification for Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERA/109-02)

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    Engineers rely heavily on manufacturers performance data for product selection. The source of the data needs to be credible to ensure that engineers meet their design intentions. In the selection process, engineers typically review data from multiple manufacturers...
    October 29th, 2002

  10. Energy Recovery Applications: Silica Gel Dessicant (ERA/105-00)

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    Silica gel is a highly porous solid adsorbent material that structurally resembles a rigid sponge. It has a very large internal surface composed of myriad microscopic cavities and a vast system of capillary channels that provide pathways connecting the internal...
    July 1st, 2000

  11. Energy Recovery Applications: Moisture Transfer and Fungal Growth in Desiccant-based Enthalpy Wheels (ERA/104-00)

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    There is evidence that fungi germinate when water condenses onto surfaces of air handling systems where nutrients are present. Surfaces which remain wet for a period of 12 to 24 hours allow fungi and mold spores already present to "bloom", resulting in a potential...
    May 1st, 2000

  12. Energy Recovery Applications: Gasseous Carryover and Cross Leakage in Energy Recovery Wheels (ERA/103-00)

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    There seems to be a certain degree of confusion in the industry as to what measures are appropriate to limit gaseous carryover and cross leakage of energy recovery wheel products. Of course, gaseous carryover and cross leakage is something that we would like...
    April 1st, 2000

  13. Energy Recovery Applications: Energy Recovery Ventilators - Stand Alone vs. Bolt-on Systems (ERA/102-00)

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    Many HVAC system designers have realized the benefits of using Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERVs) in commercial and institutional buildings. However, as with many newly adopted technologies, questions of how best to apply this product are being raised. One...
    March 1st, 2000

  14. Energy Recovery Applications: Energy Wheels vs. Plates (ERA/101-00)

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    For commercial and institutional comfort ventilation applications, total energy heat wheels are far superior to plates in terms of total heat transfer. The reason is simple: Wheels transfer latent energy (moisture), plates do not. Both wheels and plates transfer...
    December 1st, 1999

  15. Energy Recovery Applications: Energy Recovery Ventilators: The Engineer's Solution (ERA/100-00)

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    Evidence continues to mount that adequate ventilation in the workplace is necessary for a healthy and productive indoor environment. The current ASHRAE ventilation standard (62-1999) addresses this need by requiring 3 to 4 times more outside air than standard...
    November 1st, 1999

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